Here’s more info on the Tiptree symposium at the University of Oregon, December 4-5, 2015. It’s going to be a remarkable group of people, including the writers Ursula K. Le Guin, Suzy McKee Charnas, David Gerrold, and Karen Joy Fowler; my editor for the Tiptree book, Gordon Van Gelder; Alice Sheldon’s good friend and the […]

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To read her new memoir M Train you would hardly know that Patti Smith is a rock star. She doesn’t let on that at sixty-eight she’s a hard-working performer, touring, lecturing, doing benefit concerts, going to parties with fashion designers, making appearances with the Dalai Lama. In her sequel to Just Kids, her magical 2010 […]

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Jonathan Franzen is a little like Times Square, the Eiffel Tower, or a Dutch windmill. If you’re a local, you can protest all you want that he’s not the only sight worth seeing, that you know other, less touristy spots, that there’s more to our great country than this one monument that’s on all the postcards. The foreign visitors won’t be satisfied until they’ve been there.

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I’m looking forward to Emily St. John Mandel’s event at the American Book Center in Amsterdam. She’ll read from Station Eleven–the book I saw in every airport in America this summer–and I’ll do a Q&A with her afterward. The reading is Friday, August 28, at 18:30; more info at abc.nl/events.

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In honor of Alice Sheldon’s 100th birthday, Australia’s Twelfth Planet Press is publishing a selection of “letters to Tiptree” by an impressive list of science fiction and fantasy writers, editors, critics, and fans. Nicola Griffith’s letter also appeared last month in the Los Angeles Review of Books. Brit Mandelo’s letter has been excerpted at Tor.com. More on Letters to Tiptree, edited by Alisa Krasnostein and Alexandra Pierce, at the Twelfth Planet website.

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“I dreamt I was falling in love with Alice Sheldon. She didn’t want me. So I tried getting myself killed on three continents. Years passed. Finally, when I was really old, she appeared on the other end of the promenade in New York and with signals (like the ones they use on aircraft carriers to […]

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For my book on mothers & writers I’ve been reading and thinking about the painter Alice Neel (1900-1984). Neel was known for her portraits; she saw herself as a political painter, chronicling her time “using the people as evidence.” She was especially sympathetic to people whose individual humanity has not always been acknowledged in paint: […]

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The most talked-about, most prize-winning book of poetry in the United States right now is “Citizen: An American Lyric,” by the Jamaican-American writer and performer Claudia Rankine. Published in the midst of the Ferguson protests, Rankine’s prose poems are an attempt to make the reader feel the workings of racism—not only the prejudice and aggression […]

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